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Journal Information

Metrics

Impact factor
The Impact Factor measures the average number of citations received in a particular year by papers published in the journal during the two preceding years.
Year Impact factor
2020 3.318
2019 2.63
2018 2.927
2017 2.233
2016 2.227
2015 1.65
2014 1.622
2013 1.044
2012 0.667
2011 0.308

The Journal Impact Factor is published each year by Clarivate Analytics. It is a measure of the number of times an average paper in a particular journal is cited during the preceding two years.

For example:

A = the number of times articles published in a specific journal in 2014 and 2015 were cited by journals during 2016.

B = the total number of 'citable items' published by that journal in 2014 and 2015. ('Citable items' are usually articles, reviews, proceedings, etc.; not editorials or letters-to-the-editor.)

2016 impact factor = A/B.

Actual value is intentionally only displayed for the most recent year. Earlier values are available in the Journal Citation Reports from Clarivate Analytics

5 Year Impact Factor
Impact Factor based on 5 years of history
Year 5 Year Impact Factor
2019 2.291
A base of five years may be more appropriate for journals in certain fields because the body of citations may not be large enough to make reasonable comparisons, or it may take longer than two years to publish and distribute leading to a longer period before others cite the work.
Citescore
CiteScore measures average citations received per document published.
Year Citescore
2020 3.6
2019 3
2018 1.62
2017 1.36
2016 2.9

CiteScore measures the average citations received per document published in a title. CiteScore values are based on citation counts in a range of four years (e.g. 2017-2020) to peer-reviewed documents (articles, reviews, conference papers, data papers and book chapters) published in the same four calendar years, divided by the number of these documents in these same four years (e.g. 2017-20).

For example, CiteScore 2020:

A = Citations to articles, reviews, conference papers, data papers and book chapters published in 2017-2020

B = Sum of articles, reviews, conference papers, data papers and book chapters published in 2017-2020

2020 CiteScore = A/B

A CiteScore is available for most active serial titles on Scopus - peer-reviewed journals, book series, conference proceedings and trade journals.

CiteScore Percentile
CiteScore Percentile indicates the relative standing of a serial title in its subject field.
Year Citescore Percentil
2020 65 %
2019 59 %
2018 62 %
2017 61 %
2016 60 %

A serial that has a CiteScore Percentile of 96% is ranked according to CiteScore as high or higher than 96% of titles in that category. A title will receive a CiteScore Percentile for each subject area in which it's indexed in Scopus.

SJR
SRJ is a prestige metric based on the idea that not all citations are the same. SJR uses a similar algorithm as the Google page rank; it provides a quantitative and qualitative measure of the journal's impact.
Year SJR
2020 0.752
2019 0.586
2018 0.689
2017 0.462
2016 0.646

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) is a measure of the number of times an average paper in a particular journal is cited, and as such is conceptually similar to the Impact Factor. A major difference is that instead of each citation being counted as one, as with the Impact Factor, the SCImago Journal Rank assigns each citation a value greater or less than 1.00 based on the rank of the citing journal. The weighting is calculated using a three-year window of measurement and uses the Scopus database. Authors can use these metrics when deciding where to publish.

The idea is to assign weights to bibliographic citations based on the importance of the journals that issued them. Citations issued by more important journals will be more valuable than those issued by less important ones. This 'importance' will be computed recursively, i.e., the important journals will be those which in turn receive many citations from other important journals.

SNIP
SNIP measures contextual citation impact by wighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field.
Year SNIP
2020 0.984
2019 0.93
2018 0.847
2017 0.735

Source-Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field. This unique perspective enables direct comparison of sources in different subject fields. The impact of a single citation is given higher value in subject areas where citations are less likely, and vice versa.

It is a ratio, with a numerator and a denominator. SNIP's numerator is a journal's impact per publication (IPP). This is simply the average number of citations received in a particular year (e.g. 2013) by papers published in the journal during the three preceding years (e.g. 2010, 2011 and 2012).

SNIP's denominator is the Database Citation Potential (DCP). We know that there are large differences between various scientific subfields in the frequency at which authors cite papers. In view of this, for each journal an indicator is calculated of the citation potential in the subject field it covers. This citation potential is included in SNIP's denominator, the DCP. SNIP is IPP divided by DCP.

SNIP enables direct comparison of sources in different subject fields. Citation potential is shown to vary not only between journal subject categories (groupings of journals sharing a research field) or disciplines (e.g., journals in Mathematics tend to have lower values than journals in Life Sciences), but also between journals within the same subject category. For instance, basic journals tend to show higher citation potentials than applied or clinical journals. Likewise, journals covering emerging topics tend to be higher than periodicals in classical subjects, or more general journals.

SNIP helps authors to identify which journals are performing best within their subject field, helping them decide where to publish. Mouse over the circles in the visualization and click on the year to view the journal's metrics. The size of the circles are compared to the highest values in the 5-year range. This highest value is represented by a closed circle, and the open circles indicate the journal's value compared to this highest value.

Time to first decision
The average number of weeks it takes from manuscript submission to the initial decision on the article.
Year Time to first decision
2020 3.6 weeks
Article Influence
Citations from highly ranked journals are more important and influential than those from lower ranked journals.
Year Article Influence Eigen Factor
2019 0.459 0.001
2018 0.486 0.001
2017 0.407 0.001
2016 0.437 0.001
2015 0.277 0

Article Influence is calculated by dividing the Eigenfactor® score by the percentage of all articles recorded in the Journal Citation Reports that were published in a specific journal. The Article Influence score measures the average influence per article of the papers in a journal. As such, it is comparable to Clarivate Analytics widely used Impact Factor. Article Influence scores are normalized so that the mean article in the entire Clarivate Analytics Journal Citation Reports (JCR) database has an article influence of 1.00.

The Eigenfactor© score is a rating of the total importance of a specific journal. Journals are rated according to the number of incoming citations, with citations from highly ranked journals weighted to make a larger contribution to the Eigenfactor© than those from poorly ranked journals. As a measure of importance, the Eigenfactor© score scales with the total impact of a journal. Journals generating higher impact to the field tend to have larger Eigenfactor© scores. The Eigenfactor© approach is thought to be more robust than the Impact Factor metric, which counts purely incoming citations without considering the significance of those citations.

Article influence and Eigenfactor® exclude self-citations.

Online Article Publication Time
Indicates speed of publication at the journal level.
Year First Online Final online
2020 7.4 weeks 40.3 weeks
2019 8.5 weeks 48 weeks
2018 8.3 weeks 70.2 weeks
2017 8.7 weeks 40.9 weeks
2016 8.2 weeks 35.1 weeks

The average number of weeks an article takes to reach key points in the online publication process. There are two key periods:

1. From manuscript acceptance to the first appearance of the article online (with DOI).

2. From manuscript acceptance to the final appearance online of the fully paginated article.

Review Speed
Indication of review speed at the journal level.
Year First decision Final decision
2020 3.6 weeks 5.6 weeks
2019 5.1 weeks 8 weeks
2018 3.9 weeks 6.5 weeks
2017 4.4 weeks 6.1 weeks
2016 3.1 weeks 5.6 weeks

The average number of weeks it takes for an article to go through the editorial review process for this journal, including standard and desk rejects. There are two key periods:

1. From manuscript submission to the initial decision on the article.

2. From manuscript submission to the final editorial decision.

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